Monday, April 24, 2017

Congratulations to Professor Joan Ferrante!

We are thrilled to announce that Professor Joan Ferrante has been awarded the prestigious NKU Excellence in University Service Award for 2017. Joan has spent her career serving others and her record of service, leadership, and innovative transdisciplinary contributions to university initiatives and goals is remarkable and unmatched. Joan's passion for making the world a better place has shaped NKU's reputation and directly and positively impacted her colleagues, and the thousands of students she has taught. Congratulations Joan!

Check out Joan's video on Sociology (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sj9POR7YTww ) and some of her many accomplishments here: http://artscience.nku.edu/departments/sapdept/sociology/faculty-list/joan-ferrante.html

Sunday, April 16, 2017

May Philosophy on Tap


Our next Philosophy on Tap will be May 1 at 5:00PM at the Wooden Cask Brewery in Newport. Everyone is welcome. Join faculty and students from NKU, Thomas More and Gateway as we discuss the very philosophical question: What does it take to lead the good life?

Good beer. Good discussion. We can order pizza from down the street.

Friday, April 14, 2017

New Directors for Native American Studies

Photo by Edward S. Curtis, see: http://www.brucekapson.com/
We are happy to announce that Dr.s Thaddeus Bissett and T. Eric Bates will become the new co-Directors of the Native American Studies Program in SAP. Congratulations Eric and Thad!

Tuesday, April 11, 2017

SAP Alums are Awesome!

We recently received an update from NKU alumna Kathy Lou Peace. She is applying her Sociology training and course work in Native American Studies in work with Native Americans in Alaska.
The Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.

Kathy graduated in 2015 with a BSW and minor in Psychology. She had a concentration in Sociology. After she graduated Kathy received an MSW at University of Southern California in the Advance Standing Social Work Program. She recently moved to Alaska and has been working for a Native American health corporation in the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta region. She works as a clinical intake coordinator for outpatient behavioral health. The courses Kathy took in Sociology and Anthropology enriched her education and gave her valuable insights into Native American populations.
The Yukon Delta of Alaska As Seen From The Air.

Tuesday, April 4, 2017

Philosophy Film Series, April 13, 3pm


The Responsibilities Charismatic and Manipulative Leaders Have and the Responsibility of Those Who Create and Sustain These Leaders  

Thursday, April 13
3 pm
Landrum 209

Elmer Gantry
[Burt Lancaster, Jean Simmons]

What Happens When Religion and a Con Man Meet?

Monday, March 13, 2017

Celtic Music Concert at NKU March 15!





Join us on Wednesday in the Landrum 110 Auditorium for a free and fun celebration of Celtic Heritage Month. Professors Dan Curtin and Rick Boyce, accompanied by student Cori Davis, will be playing a set of Celtic music. Refreshments will be provided. Approximate end time is 4:30 PM.


Friday, March 3, 2017

A Face in the Crowd

A Face in the Crowd will air at 3 pm on Thursday, March 16 in Landrum 209 at NKU

Philosophy Film Series
The Responsibilities Charismatic and Manipulative Leaders Have and the Responsibility of Those Who Create and Sustain These Leaders

Thursday, March 16
A Face in the Crowd
[Andy Griffith, as you have never seen him; Patricia Neal, Walter Matthau]

Tuesday, February 7, 2017

Philosophy Film Series--Network


All Showings at 3 pm in Landrum 209

The Responsibilities Charismatic and Manipulative Leaders Have and the Responsibility of Those Who Create and Sustain These Leaders  


Thursday, February 16
Network
[Peter Finch, Faye Dunaway, William Holden, Robert Duvall]

Wednesday, January 25, 2017

The Northerner Highlights Dr. Wakefield's Research in the Congo

In the Congo, a reflection of ourselves: NKU Professor to research Bonobos in May

 

The Northerner just posted this article on Dr. Wakefield's upcoming work in the Congo:  http://www.thenortherner.com/arts-and-life/2017/01/25/congo-reflection-nku-professor-research-bonobos-may/

Join us Friday, Jan. 27 for the Philosophers’ Café

Philosophers’ Café
Topic: “Fake News” & the Press

Location: Student Union Rm. 302
Date: Friday, Jan. 27th
Time: 3 - 4 pm

Friday, January 13, 2017

Philosophy Film Series


All Showings at 3 pm in Landrum 209

The Responsibilities Charismatic  and Manipulative Leaders Have and the Responsibility of Those Who Create and Sustain These Leaders  

Please join us- this event is open to all!
Thursday, January 19
Jakob the Liar
[Robin Williams, Alan Arkin, Liev Schreiber]

Wednesday, January 11, 2017

Coming soon: Native Nations: The Survival of Fourth World Peoples, 2nd Edition

This Spring Professor Sharlotte Neely's edited volume, Native Nations: The Survival of Fourth World Peoples, 2nd Edition will be available!
Here is an example of what you can expect in the second edition:

"Indigenous minorities—Fourth World peoples—continue to exist in some of the wealthiest, most modern, democratic nations on earth.  Despite acculturating to some degree, these native groups have survived with their unique ethnic identities and many of their cultural traditions intact.    
  
In recent years the phrase "Fourth World" has been used in at least three, sometimes overlapping, ways.  Sometimes the term has been used to mean the poorest of the Third World countries where the First World refers to wealthier democratic nations often aligned with the West, the Second World refers to one-time or current communist nations previously aligned with the former Soviet Union, and the Third World refers to politically non-aligned, poorer, usually non-Western, nations.  In other cases "Fourth World" has been used to refer to the world's unrecognized, non-sovereign, "wannabe nations" like Tibet, Kurdistan, Palestine, Catalonia, Euskal Herria, the Kingdom of Hawaii, or so many others that would like to carve their territory out of one or more recognized nations.  (Most recently, South Sudan has actually made the transition from wannabe nation to sovereign nation.)  Finally, "Fourth World" can refer to the surviving, indigenous (native, aboriginal) minorities within the wealthier First World nations.  That is the meaning of "Fourth World" in this book. 

Here nine anthropologists, one linguist, one historian, one geographer, and one political scientist focus on nine groups of Fourth World peoples within twelve First World nations and, for comparison, one indigenous group in a Second World nation and one in four Third World nations.  All are compared and contrasted in regard to their strategies for survival. 
By Sharlotte Neely